//Founders day! 110 years of Scouting//

Today is known as Founder’s Day in the Scouting movement as it’s the birthday of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of Scouting. 2017 also marks 110 years of Scouting! So I thought I’d talk a bit about what Scouting means to me. ūüôā

I started scouting in 2007 when I joined Cubs, and left scouting last September as I couldn’t keep up with it as well as starting a-levels, so in total I’ve spent 8 years of my life in Scouts and what an amazing time that’s been! 

One of the most prominent things that comes to mind when thinking about Scouting and what it means to me and for all the millions of other scouts around the world is the word ‘discovery’. 

Obviously, scouting provides a doorway through which we can have access to the outdoor world and explore more about the place where we live but alongside that, it gives young people a safe environment in which to discover ourselves; who we are and how we fit in with the world and society. 

That’s something that I’ve really valued throughout my time in Scouting, because the inclusive atmosphere at my local scout group made feel comfortable enough to be myself and develop as an individual and I’m really grateful that I had this opportunity growing up. It’s definitely helped to shape me as a person and taught me invaluable skills such as communication and respect which are often lost in the hustle-bustle of modern society. Most importantly, it’s given me a more positive outlook on life as I know that even if I’m faced with challenges that seem impossible, there is always away to get through them with perseverance and hard work.

Despite being a girl in a scouting movement that is predominantly – but not exclusively – made up of boys, during my time in scouts I didn’t once feel that I couldn’t – or shouldn’t – do something just because of my gender. The opportunities and experiences scouting gave me were some of the best of my life – from attending Gilwell 24 and being surrounded by thousands of other scouts from around the UK and further a field to hiking up mountains in Austria and volunteering as a Young Leader and helping other young people get the most out of their time in Scouting. However I know that young people in other countries may not have the chance to experience this so I’d like to say that I hope that as the scouting movement grows, it will help young people in countries where society is not equal or inclusive to have some of the experiences I’ve had and be given equal opportunities to discover the world around them and develop as young people, regardless of gender, religion, race or sexual orientation. 

Although I am not currently a member of the scouting movement, I will never forget what it means to me and one day hope to get back into scouting and help young people get the most out of the wonderful association that I love.

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//Scouting for girls, scouting for all//

Today I read an article summarising the 2016 UK Scouting census which was full of statistics – some which made me very proud to be a member of such an inclusive youth movement, and others which made me realise there is still a long way to go before Scouting around the world is fully inclusive.

This year marks the 25 anniversary of girls being accepted and welcomed in to all sections of Scouting, for all age groups. 25 years is a relatively short amount of time compared to the 109 years that Scouting has been running in total. For just under a quarter of the Scouting movement’s lifetime, girls like me have been allowed to explore the outdoors, enjoy thrilling adventures and most importantly have fun with other youngsters whilst boys have been able to do so for 109 years.

Although 25 years of girls in Scouting is a¬†very important and exciting milestone to have reached, it does disappoint me a little that it wasn’t until 84 years after Lord Baden-Powell hosted the first ever Scout camp on Brownsea Island and therefore created the Scouting movement, that girls were given the same amazing opportunities that Scouting has to offer as boys had nation-wide.

Despite this, I do feel very lucky and honored to be a representative 25% of the Scouting movement in the UK on this blog. Although I do wish the percentage of females in Scouting was higher, I’m sure, over the years, this figure will continue to grow and I want to be a part of that.

Over my 8 years in Scouting, I have seen the number of girls in my group steadily grow. When I first started in Cubs in 2007 Рwhich was, coincidentally, the 100th year of Scouting РI was one of two girls in a Cub pack of around 30. A few years later when I moved up to Scouts, there were probably around 5 girls at any one time. Now I am an Explorer scout and am proud to say that my Explorer unit has a healthy, almost equal, balance of girls and boys.

Scouting has been such a life-changing experience for me Р I have grown in confidence, for a start, but I have also experienced so many extraordinary things that outside of Scouting I could never have dreamed of participating in and achieving .

For example: I have been white water rafting in the rapids of an Austria river, I have zip-lined over a ravine despite my fear of heights, I have led a group on a 10 mile hike in the middle of the night, map reading as well as completing various challenges along the way, I have learnt valuable skills such as first aid and fire safety, I have attended a national camp with over 7,000 participants from around the UK, I have visited the birthplace of Scouting РBrownsea Island, I have been on more muddy, wet, cold Scout camps than I can count on my fingers yet all these memories make me beam with happiness at as I remember them. I have done so much in Scouting that I never thought I could ever and would ever do, however there is still so much more I could do to ensure other girls and young people get to have opportunities like these and memories to last a lifetime.

That is why I’m blogging about Scouting, to get the word out that ‘Scouting is for girls and Scouting is for all’. That’s also why I have been a Young Leader at a Cub pack for 2 years now, to show the next generation of young people what Scouting is all about and to inspire more youngsters to join the adventure. As my Explorer leader said to me a few weeks ago – ‘people like you are the future of Scouting’. In the next 5, 10, 15 years it is going to be young people like me who already help to run and organise Scouting on a small scale, volunteering our free time despite having to study for exams and complete vast amounts of school work, to help youngsters get everything out of Scouting that I did when I was their age. It is going to be us that are going to be the face of Scouting in the years to come,¬†adding to¬†the already 115,000 strong network of adult volunteers in the UK. It’s my way of giving back to Scouting, for saying ‘thank you’ for everything it has helped me achieve and for making me the person I am today.

However, despite the fact that UK now has 573,000 members in the UK alone, it has been estimated that as much as 50% or more of the British population do not know that girls are welcomed into Scouting, and we need to change this.We need to spread the message that Scouting is for all.

Although in the UK I am able to be a Scout, in other countries around the world girls don’t have the same opportunity as I have to take part in Scouting and it’s not just girls either – in some other countries, youngsters are prevented from joining Scouting because of not just their gender but their sexuality, their race, their religion…the list goes on. Although I would love to see the day when the proportion of female Scouts in the UK equals or even beats that of males, even more so would I¬†love to see the day that all youngsters¬†around the world have the chance to be involved in such a wonderful movement.

Yes, Scouting in the UK is inclusive, and we are very lucky to have that, but Scouting around the world at the moment isn’t entirely inclusive. Not only do we need to spread the message within the UK that Scouting is for girls too, we need to do so in every country around the world. Scouting isn’t and shouldn’t be a gender specific youth movement in any country and in order to move towards a more equal society, we need to spread this message. Even if you are not or have not been involved in Scouting yourself, even if you don’t know anything about Scouting whatsoever, I hope that you will take away from this post that Scouting is for all and understand why it is so important to me and many others that this message is spread across the world so that Scouting isn’t known as ‘a youth movement for adventurous boys’ but ‘a youth movement for adventurous young people’.